Theme
9:56am April 18, 2014

“Unlike a rusting highway bridge, digital infrastructure does not betray the effects of age. And, unlike roads and bridges, large portions of the software infrastructure of the Internet are built and maintained by volunteers, who get little reward when their code works well but are blamed, and sometimes savagely derided, when it fails. To some degree, this is beginning to change: venture-capital firms have made substantial investments in code-infrastructure projects, like GitHub and the Node Package Manager. But money and support still tend to flow to the newest and sexiest projects, while boring but essential elements like OpenSSL limp along as volunteer efforts. It’s easy to take open-source software for granted, and to forget that the Internet we use every day depends in part on the freely donated work of thousands of programmers. If open-source software is at the heart of the Internet, then we might need to examine it from time to time to make sure it’s not bleeding.”

— The Internet’s Telltale Heartbleed : The New Yorker (via new-aesthetic)
1:35am April 18, 2014

archiving-a-life:

amelie-liedtome:

"one trick to make guys fall for you!!"

"10 fashion trends guys HATE!"

"If you want him to like you, follow these tips!" 

"he cheated on you- here’s how to win him back"

STOP TRYING TO MAKE ME BELIEVE THAT I NEED A MAN TO VALIDATE MY SELF WORTH

LITERALLY 

JUST

STOP IT

The best is when you inform a man, overtly or gently - THAT YOU DON’T FUCKING NEED HIM.

"one trick to make guys fall for you!!" TRIPWIRE.

"10 fashion trends guys HATE!"  SEE HOW MANY YOU CAN COMBINE.

"If you want him to like you, follow these tips!"  MAGICAL LOVE POTION. TOTALLY WORKS.

"he cheated on you- here’s how to win him back"  CRUSH HIS UNWORTHY SKULL.

12:56am April 18, 2014
dapenguinninja:

Third Rock From The Sun

dapenguinninja:

Third Rock From The Sun

12:52am April 18, 2014

peregrintoolc:

I’m thankful for all the different ways I can eat potatoes

10:56pm April 17, 2014
radicallabrador:

Not pictured: the lovely professors who selected me for it and my husband looking RAWR in his best suit. (No, I’m not concerned with maintaining anonymity.)

congratulations! :D :D :D

radicallabrador:

Not pictured: the lovely professors who selected me for it and my husband looking RAWR in his best suit. (No, I’m not concerned with maintaining anonymity.)

congratulations! :D :D :D

10:54pm April 17, 2014

April 17 blog

Today I am visiting my family, woo!  Did the presentation and it went fairly well.  Now we hold out for grades… though I’m not really all that worried.

That’s it, though…. Next week is a few more presentations from other people, and then the class is over.  I’m done with assignments for it…. which means I’m now halfway done with my Master’s degree.

Wow.

Also saw someone that I’ve had a… complicated relationship with over the last 17 years or so.  I’ll figure out what I think about it eventually.

10:04pm April 17, 2014
9:08pm April 17, 2014
8:22pm April 17, 2014

ceruleanpaper:

if all I was doing was working, my life would be under control.

If all I was doing was work or school, my life would be under control.

8:12pm April 17, 2014
erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).